See The Full List Of Nominees – Hollywood Life



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The 65th Grammy Awards rolled out their nominations Tuesday (Nov. 15), and from the looks of it, the Feb. 5, 2023 ceremony promises to be one of the most star-studded events in recent music history. After a nomination period he saw albums from Beyonce, Taylor Swift, Adele, Bad Bunny, Harry Styles, Kendrick Lamar, And more, the Grammy nominations revealed just how the past twelve months were an incredible year for music. Check out the list below, courtesy of The New York Times

Following a COVID-affected 2021 ceremony that put an emphasis on performances, the 2022 Grammys were a return to the status quo — in a sense. The ceremony relocated to the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas and ultimately saw Jon Batiste win Album of the Year. His This is Us beat Justin Bieber (Justice), Doja Cat (Planet Her), Taylor Swift (Evermore), Kanye “Ye” West (Donda), HER (Back Of My Mind), Billie Eilish (Happier than ever), Lil Nas X (Montero), Olivia Rodrigo (Sour), and Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga (Love for sale). Silk Sonic won Record and Song of the Year with “Leave The Door Open,” and Olivia took home the Best New Artist award.

A lot of familiar faces took home Grammys in 2022 – and faces no one expected, specifically Louis CK winning the Best Comedy Album for Sincerely Louis CK (Louis was nominated again, BTW). With Kanye “Ye” West’s recent antisemitism, one question heading into the nominations was if the Recording Academy extends a similar open-armed embrace with his 2022 album, Donda 2? Even though Ye has made it clear what he thinks about the Grammy Awards by posting a video of him urinating on one of his trophies in 2020? Apparently, no. Kanye was shut out of the Rap category, suggesting he was either snubbed or that he didn’t submit his album for consideration.

Beyoncé (MEGA)

All this and more will be answered on Feb. 5, 2023, when the 65th Grammy Awards arrive

See the full list below:

Song of the Year

  • “Abcdefu,” Sara Davis, Gayle and Dave Pittenger, songwriters (Gayle)
  • “About Damn Time,” Melissa “Lizzo” Jefferson, Eric Frederic, Blake Slatkin and Theron Makiel Thomas, songwriters (Lizzo)
  • “All Too Well (10 Minute Version) (The Short Film),” Liz Rose and Taylor Swift, songwriters (Taylor Swift)
  • “As It Was,” Tyler Johnson, Kid Harpoon and Harry Styles, songwriters (Harry Styles)
  • “Bad Habit,” Matthew Castellanos, Brittany Fousheé, Diana Gordon, John Carroll Kirby & Steve Lacy, songwriters (Steve Lacy)
  • “Break My Soul,” Beyoncé, S. Carter, Terius “The-Dream” Gesteelde-Diamant and Christopher A. Stewart, songwriters (Beyoncé)
  • “Easy on Me,” Adele Adkins and Greg Kurstin, songwriters (Adele)
  • “God Did,” Tarik Azzouz, E. Blackmon, Khaled Khaled, F. LeBlanc, Shawn Carter, John Stephens, Dwayne Carter, William Roberts and Nicholas Warwar, songwriters (DJ Khaled featuring Rick Ross, Lil Wayne, Jay-Z, John Legend and Friday)
  • “The Heart Part 5,” Jake Kosich, Johnny Kosich, Kendrick Lamar and Matt Schaeffer, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar)
  • “Just Like That,” Bonnie Raitt, songwriter (Bonnie Raitt)

Record of the Year

“Don’t Shut Me Down,” Abba
“Easy on Me,” Adele
“Break My Soul,” Beyoncé
“Good Morning Gorgeous,” Mary J. Blige
“You and Me on the Rock,” Brandi Carlile featuring Lucius
“Woman,” Doja Cat
“Bad Habit,” Steve Lacy
“The Heart Part 5,” Kendrick Lamar
“About Damn Time,” Lizzo
“As It Was,” Harry Styles

Best Pop Solo Performance

“Easy on Me,” Adele
“Moscow Mule,” Bad Bunny
“Woman,” Doja Cat
“Bad Habit,” Steve Lacy
“About Damn Time,” Lizzo
“As It Was,” Harry Styles

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance

“Don’t Shut Me Down,” Abba
“Bam Bam,” Camila Cabello featuring Ed Sheeran
“My Universe,” Coldplay and BTS
“I Like You (A Happier Song),” Post Malone and Doja Cat
“Unholy,” Sam Smith and Kim Petras

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

“Higher,” Michael Buble
When Christmas Comes Around… Kelly Clarkson
“I Dream of Christmas (Extended),” Norah Jones
“Evergreen,” Pentatonix
“Thank you,” Diana Ross

Best Pop Vocal Album

“Voyage,” Abba
“30,” Adele
“Music of the Spheres,” Coldplay
“Special,” Lizzo
“Harry’s House,” Harry Styles

Best Dance/Electronic Recording

“Break My Soul,” Beyoncé
“Rosewood,” Bonobo
“Don’t Forget My Love,” Diplo and Miguel
“I’m Good (Blue),” David Guetta and Bebe Rexha
“Intimidated,” Kaytranada featuring HER
“On My Knees,” Rüfüs du Sol

Best Dance/Electronic Music Album

“Renaissance,” Beyoncé
“Fragments,” Bonobo
“Diplo,” Diplo
“The Last Goodbye,” Odessa
Surrender, Rüfüs du Sol

Best Rap Performance

“God Did,” DJ Khaled featuring Rick Ross, Lil Wayne, Jay-Z, John Legend and Fridayy “Vegas,” Doja Cat
“Pushin P,” Gunna and Future featuring Young Thug
“FNF (Let’s Go),” Hitkidd and Glorilla
“The Heart Part 5,” Kendrick Lamar

Taylor Swift (ZUMAPRESS.com/MEGA)

Best Melodic Rap Performance

“Beautiful,” DJ Khaled featuring Future and SZA
“Wait for U,” Future featuring Drake and Tems
“First Class,” Jack Harlow
“Die Hard,” Kendrick Lamar featuring Blxst and Amanda Reifer
“Big Energy (Live),” Latto

Best Rap Song

  • “Churchill Downs,” Ace G, BEDRM, Matthew Samuels, Tahrence Brown, Rogét Chahayed, Aubrey Graham, Jack Harlow and Jose Velazquez, songwriters (Jack Harlow featuring Drake)
  • “God Did,” Tarik Azzouz, E. Blackmon, Khaled Khaled, F. LeBlanc, Shawn Carter, John Stephens, Dwayne Carter, William Roberts and Nicholas Warwar, songwriters (DJ Khaled featuring Rick Ross, Lil Wayne, Jay-Z, John Legend and Friday)
  • “The Heart Part 5,” Jake Kosich, Johnny Kosich, Kendrick Lamar and Matt Schaeffer, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar)
  • “Pushin P,” Lucas Depante, Nayvadius Wilburn, Sergio Kitchens, Wesley Tyler Glass and Jeffery Lamar Williams, songwriters (Gunna and Future featuring Young Thug)
  • “Wait for U,” Tejiri Akpoghene, Floyd E. Bentley III, Jacob Canady, Isaac De Boni, Aubrey Graham, Israel Ayomide Fowobaje, Nayvadius Wilburn, Michael Mule, Oluwatoroti Oke and Temilade Openiyi, songwriters (Future featuring Drake and Tems)

Best Rap Album

“God Did,” DJ Khaled
“I Never Liked You,” Future
“Come Home the Kids Miss You,” Jack Harlow
“Mr. Morale & the Big Steppers,” Kendrick Lamar
“It’s Almost Dry,” Pusha T

Best instrumental composition

“African Tales,” Paquito D’Rivera, composer (Tasha Warren and Dave Eggar)
“El País Invisible,” Miguel Zenón, composer (Miguel Zenón, José Antonio Zayas Cabán, Ryan Smith and Casey Rafn)
“Fronteras (Borders) Suite: Al-Musafir Blues,” Danilo Pérez, composer (Danilo Pérez featuring the Global Messengers)
“Refuge,” Geoffrey Keezer, composer (Geoffrey Keezer)
“Snapshots,” Pascal Le Boeuf, composer (Tasha Warren and Dave Eggar)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella

“As Days Go By (an Arrangement of the ‘Family Matters’ Theme Song),” Armand Hutton, arranger (Armand Hutton featuring Terrell Hunt and Just 6)
“How Deep Is Your Love,” Matt Cusson, arranger (Kings Return)
“Main Titles (Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness),” Danny Elfman, arranger (Danny Elfman)
“Minnesota, WI,” Remy Le Boeuf, arranger (Remy Le Boeuf)
“Scrapple From the Apple,” John Beasley, arranger (Magnus Lindgren, John Beasley and the SWR Big Band featuring Martin Aeur)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals

“Let It Happen,” Louis Cole, arranger (Louis Cole)
“Never Gonna Be Alone,” Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier featuring Lizzy McAlpine and John Mayer)
“Optimistic Voices / No Love Dying,” Cécile McLorin Salvant, arranger (Cécile McLorin Salvant)
“Songbird (Orchestral Version),” Vince Mendoza, arranger (Christine McVie)
“2 + 2 = 5 (Arr. Nathan Schram),” Nathan Schram and Becca Stevens, arrangers (Becca Stevens and Attacca Quartet)

Songwriter of the Year, Non-Classical

Amy Allen
Nija Charles
Tobias Jesso Jr.
The-Dream
Laura Veltz

This list is updating


For the 2023 Grammys, the Recording Academy unveiled five new categories, bringing the total number of categories up to 91. The categories include Best Spoken Word Poetry Album, Best Americana Performance, Best Alternative Music Performance, Best Score Soundtrack For Video Games And Other Interactive Media, and the Songwriter of the Year, Non-Classical Award.

What they have to do to enter in the OEP [Online Entry Process] is to have a minimum of five songs in which they’re listed as a non-performing, non-producing songwriter or co-writer.” Susan Stewart, the Managing Director of the Recording Academy’s Songwriters & Composers Wing, said in a Grammy.com interview. “We want people to understand that there are people behind these songs, who create a piece of art from nothing. We want to make sure they’re recognized. It’s an amazing profession.”

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